Webinar 3: Constructive Wastewalks. with Mr. Simon Watson

Webinar 3

Constructive Wastewalks.

with Mr. Simon Watson

Wednesday 3rd of August 2016, 15:00 – 16:00 GMT

Simon Watson, Team Development – Jones Engineering, Time Served Craftsman, HNC Building Services, Gold Medal Winner Youth Skill Olympics – Plumbing Section. Simon has been involved in the Construction Industry for 30 years and has moved from Apprentice Plumber, through tradesman and various Supervisory roles, and onto Construction Manager. Simon’s role within Jones Engineering changed in late 2013 where he moved into a training and team development capacity. He has responsibility for monitoring all apprentice movement within the company, including additional in-house skill training.  He compiles quarterly assessments of all trade labour within the company and identifies any potential weaknesses where supplementary training may be required. He has overseen the role out of comprehensive Lean training for over 160 of the company’s senior engineering staff, management, and supervisors, and is part of a team that compiles and issues the company’s monthly publication The LEAN Times.

Website www.joneseng.com

E-mail swatson@joneseng.com

Constructive Wastewalks

What is a Wastewalk?

 Where do we find waste in our daily routines?

 How to implement a Wastewalk programme.

 Jones Engineering tells its story on how introducing Wastewalks has improved productivity in the workplace.

Simon Watson, Team Development – Jones Engineering, Time Served Craftsman, HNC Building Services, Gold Medal Winner Youth Skill Olympics – Plumbing Section. Simon has been involved in the Construction Industry for 30 years and has moved from Apprentice Plumber, through tradesman and various Supervisory roles, and onto Construction Manager. Simon’s role within Jones Engineering changed in late 2013 where he moved into a training and team development capacity. He has responsibility for monitoring all apprentice movement within the company, including additional in-house skill training.  He compiles quarterly assessments of all trade labour within the company and identifies any potential weaknesses where supplementary training may be required. He has overseen the role out of comprehensive Lean training for over 160 of the company’s senior engineering staff, management, and supervisors, and is part of a team that compiles and issues the company’s monthly publication The LEAN Times.

Website www.joneseng.com

E-mail swatson@joneseng.com

Constructive Wastewalks

What is a Wastewalk?

Where do we find waste in our daily routines?

How to implement a Wastewalk programme.

Jones Engineering tells its story on how introducing Wastewalks has improved productivity in the workplace.

There were some questions that we could not answer during the webinar, so Simon Watson has kindly agreed to answer them offline, and we have provided the answers here:

How do you manage to keep people focused on carrying out waste walks when projects are busy?

Easy to keep people focused when project is ramping. Have used reward system through “A Better Way” for any good ideas. Problems start when project has peaked and people are starting to leave…..hard to maintain same energy at that stage.

Have you had any stand out items that were picked up from a waste walk?

Not one stand out item, but a lot of good ideas have come from them. Rigging, lifting attachments, covers for orbital weld heads etc.

How do you transfer the learnings between sites and crews?

We have set up a monthly newsletter called “The LEAN Times” which is issued to all staff and copies printed for the guys in the field who are not on company e-mail accounts. Updates of new innovations come in from sites and are shared this way.

Did you find the walks improved the overall Quality output?

Walks did assist with quality improvements, but we also increased focus on the most common punch-list items that were appearing across all sites by producing a QA handbook, listing these and issuing to all employees. This created awareness of the biggest issues at a level in the organisation where it could have the most effect.

Do you use a reward system for ideas?

We have a suggestion box scheme “A Better Way” which was brought in to encourage ideas to be submitted. Any good ideas as a result of waste walks are encouraged to submit a card to this. All suggestions are reviewed and any that would aid efficiencies are introduced and rewarded. This is “win-win” for company and employee as company makes savings/improvements day to day as a result.

How difficult is it to convince senior management to engage & how would you sell it to them?

What we have found is that actions and results speak louder than words. Just try it out as a pilot and see what kind of results you get. There are always good “low hanging fruit” at the start, so initial results will be good and will convince management that this can only be a positive thing.

What’s the mix of people typically?

Small groups (normally two or three max.) Critical thing is to have one in each group who does not normally work in the area where the waste walk is being carried out…..gives a “fresh pair of eyes” looking at the tasks

Is this something that requires a lot of training?

No. Mostly this is common sense. Just observe the activity and check against the list of eight wastes to identify if any of these are taking place. If you see any of these, speak to the crew and ask if they were aware of it and have they any thoughts on how the process could be improved

Can you just start?

Yes. As stated above, the best approach is to just try it out as a pilot. Once you get the best approach that suits your company/site, you can roll it out to a wider audience.

Did you ever see any go wrong/badly?

No. It’s a simple process and there’s not much that can go wrong really. Maintaining interest on an ongoing basis is more difficult. Rotating partners and the areas being reviewed is important to keep people interested.

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